For decades, alarms have sounded about declining engagement. Trust in Numbers questions whether such success in the study of stars, molecules, or cells should be an attractive model for research on human societies, and examines why the natural sciences are highly quantitative in the first place. This new theory is based on 45 years of careful basic scientific research with thousands of couples and families, including synchronized observational, interview, physiological, and questionnaire data. Gottman also explains how to create emotional attunement when it is missing, to lay a foundation that will carry the relationship through difficult times. In this landmark book, Naomi Oreskes offers a bold and compelling defense of science, revealing why the social character of scientific knowledge is its greatest strength—and the greatest reason we can trust it. In 1993, a group called Mothers Opposing Pollution (MOP) appeared, calling itself "the largest women’s environmental group in Australia, with thousands of supporters across the country." Now this can only be done by a very brave woman and man. Drawing on his original research, Zak teases out science-backed insights for building high-trust organizations. Public relations firms and corporations know well how to exploit your trust to get you to buy what they have to sell: Let you hear it from a neutral third party, like a professor or a pediatrician or a soccer mom or a watchdog group. The book begins with a thorough overview of social media to its applications in learning, business, and an analysis of social media and trust. The past decade has witnessed a renaissance in scientific approaches to the study of morality. Remember happiness comes from within. Trust comes only with the passage of time. The authors apply their backgrounds in information technology, knowledge management, trust, and business to generate some provocative and instructive guidance to the readers on how to best leverage knowledge internally and externally to meet the organizational strategic goals. They also discovered that these soft factors are essentially the means clients use to judge an asset manager's benevolent intentions, one of the two dimensions of the universal human evaluation more commonly known as 'trust'. To get to the root of the problem, you’ve got to go deeper. Director of the Computational Social and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory . Trust Factor opens a window on how brain chemicals affect behavior, why trust gets squashed, and ways to consciously stimulate it by celebrating effort, sharing information, promoting ownership, and more. Drawing on recent findings from political science and other fields ranging from history to anthropology, Mercier shows that the narrative of widespread gullibility, in which a credulous public is easily misled by demagogues and charlatans, is simply wrong. Live your life so that people miss you and remember you, even after you have gone. Have faith in you. Clear, easy principles to spot what's nonsense and what's reliable Each year, teachers, administrators, and parents face a barrage of new education software, games, workbooks, and professional development programs purporting to be "based on the latest research." Packed with examples from The Container Store, Zappos, and Herman Miller, Trust Factor harnesses our neurochemistry to effectively cultivate work places where trust, joy, and commitment compound naturally. It turned out that the group’s spokesperson, Alana Maloney, was in truth a woman named Janet Rundle, the business partner of a man who did P.R. The Gottmans have studied some families for as long as 20 consecutive years. This book, an essential follow-up to his 1999 The Marriage Clinic, offers therapists, students, and researchers detailed intervention for working with couples, and offers couples a roadmap to a stronger future together. : How Industry Manipulates Science and Gambles with Your Future, Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber, authors of Toxic Sludge Is Good For You, offer a chilling exposé on the manufacturing of "independent experts." Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences . Science communication seeks to engage individuals and groups with evidence-based information about the nature, outcomes, and social consequences of science and technology.