-If you are setting up shipping rates for an online store, consider looking through the USPS PDF below to get an idea of costs around the country and internationally depending on weight and size. This cut-down size meets the requirements for First Class International packages. Sign up to receive periodic info about new print releases and projects. If the shipping status isn’t updated for a while, I reach out to the customer to verify they received their item. If you work with large pieces, you may consider using shipping tubes and rolling your art. The method I’m outlining here applies to prints 16x20” and smaller. You don’t need to get too fancy to get started. Why do you use no flap sleeves instead of protective closure sleeves?I’ve found protective closure sleeves are really overkill for most art prints. ← How It Was Made: Rhino Beetle Resin Figure. Which carrier do I use? Should I ship internationally or just domestically? This is my way of shipping artwork. 18x24” mailer + two 16x20” cardboard sheets. If the contents of the box shift during shipment it’s possible one canvas could damage another. You may also want to consider following up with your customer once the order arrives to see how things are going. How much will shipping cost me? For even larger prints, I have to resort to a large diameter (4-5”) shipping tube. Once I started to consistently have 2 to 3 sales in my store a week, I purchased a bulk bundle of boxes so I’d never have to stockpile random Amazon boxes again. (At no additional cost to you, of course!). OPTION B: Seal both sides of the boards with small piece of blue painter’s tape to secure the print. I have to get creative at this point. Weigh and measure the shipment, and print your own labels at home. For larger prints, a cardboard tube makes an excellent shipping container. Kelly Marie • Artist • Creative Consultant, *The product links in this blog are affiliate links. Shipping materials can sometimes be prohibitively expensive, but they are essential when it comes to selling your artwork and protecting it while in transit. After pressing down the adhesive flap, I always wrap two pieces of packaging tape around the ends (right underneath the pull tab to open the flap) just to make sure it doesn’t pop open. Thank you card- always show gratitude when your customer buys something. Buy a postage scale if you don’t have one already. Option One: Hand write or print the customer’s name and address on paper and affix with tape to the box. I inspect the items ordered and then wrap each canvas in a sheet of thin plastic. Nobody enjoys the hassle of receiving damaged prints either from the standpoint of a customer or a seller. When I upgraded my online store to Weebly, I chose to use app integration and picked Shippo to simplify my shipping needs. Pledging just $1 a month enables me to keep doing what I do. But this would force customers to spend time and money on re-stretching the canvas. I found an Amazon box in my recycle pile that fit the largest canvas size I offered in my store, I created a sample shipment to weigh, and then I input the dimensions and weight into the USPS shipping calculator to have an idea of what the cost would be on my end. I cut and crinkle sheets of brown kraft paper to serve as a cushion for the bottom of the box and on top of the art. Where will I get my shipping materials? I include a link to my policy on my receipts and order confirmations. I’m here to tell you that shipping doesn’t have to be scary. Boxes (I researched boxes on Amazon or saved boxes from my personal shipments.). Sure they’ll protect against water getting in to the sleeve or other misc debris, but the odds of that happening are slim. Kraft stay-flat style mailers with an adhesive strip in various sizes (6x8, 9x11 1/2, 12 3/4x15, and 18x24), No flap, clear print sleeves (sleeves without the adhesive flap), Corrugated cardboard pads/sheets in various sizes (5x7, 8x10, 11x14, and 16x20). I use 18x24 mailers because the 17x21 size doesn’t expand enough to accommodate two sheets of 16x20 backer board. I watch all of my orders on my Shippo dashboard to make sure all packages are delivered. If you enjoy my blogs and gain any inspiration from the content I put out there, please consider becoming a Patron of Messy Ever After on Patreon. For even larger prints, I have to resort to a large diameter (4-5”) shipping tube. If you take my approach and buy a bundle of boxes that can fit one or two sizes then you can be more conservative in your investments instead of buying a crap ton of sizes that you have no guarantee of using right away. If you choose to use sleeves that close with an adhesive strip, make sure you purchase the protective closure type versus the type with the adhesive on the flap. Option two is my preferred method. Seal the box with packing tape. (You can also use self sealing poly bags.) Securing the flaps with clear tape. Shipping Labels: Once your art is packaged, it’s time to get a shipping label. Sometimes I use three 16x20” sheets for more critical shipping applications. You can use an invoice as well. Your 6x8” mailer ships as a package, not a letter. I’m sure every artist does things a little differently, but as long as you ensure your art is safely packaged and can survive the aggressive journey most boxes take during the shipping process then you’re good to go. The UPS Store can help with crating and shipping your large art items. Consider placing a piece of cardboard over the surface of the art to protect it.