As the greens and weeds (these methods will work with dandelion greens, too) start producing be sure to preserve some for the seasons ahead. Skip this step and you'll end up with black goo when you defrost your greens (yuck). Lay flat on dehydrator trays and dry until crisp. Note: chard and bok choy have thick but tender and delicious leaf stalks, but they do not freeze well. Rather than tossing them into the compost pile save them for later by learning how to preserve leafy greens with these easy methods. Preserve the texture of leaves with glycerin. Working in batches if necessary, toss handfuls of your greens into the boiling water, stir to cover and blanch until bright green and softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Pull them out and reheat for a quick side dish on a busy weeknight. Pop Leaves into the Microwave – This method requires monitoring as leaves can catch fire if left in too long and only works with fresh leaves that are not yet dried out. Freeze. Add the greens to a large bowl of cold water and swish them vigorously to loosen any dirt. Trim off stems and ribs. Blanch and freeze the green parts of these vegetables and reserve the leaf stalks to use fresh in a recipe. Transfer your clean, dry greens to a large resealable bag lined with a dish towel or two paper towels, and gently press the bag to remove excess air. Squeeze hard. You can store them in a fraction of the space — and prolong their life — by simply chilling them raw or cooked, or blanching and freezing them. Leafy greens like collards, chard, and spinach can be canned. Whether you’re returning from an overambitious trip to the supermarket or organizing an unruly haul from your C.S.A. Sauté them with olive oil or butter over medium heat, seasoning with salt and pepper and perhaps some garlic or red-pepper flakes, until wilted, or simply steam or blanch, if preferred. Immediately run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Perhaps a natural extension to this method is dipping your bright leaves into melted wax. This method won't preserve color perfectly, but your leaves will stay bright for longer than if left untreated. Those leafy greens that many of us start harvesting in early spring can be quite productive. Run dried greens through a blender to turn into a fine powder. Toasted sandwiches/jaffles can hide a huge amount of wild greens in one meal. Bring a large pot of heavily salted water to a boil over high heat and prepare a large bowl of ice water. Drain, then tightly squeeze them by the fistful over the sink. Let blanch in the boiling water for 1 minute. Swiss chard is my favorite to preserve...I freeze the extras for winter. We eat them in salads, toss them in soups, blend them in smoothies and more. i have cut up small and canned in past with water. Use Raw Hearty Greens in These Recipes: Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad | Arroz Caldo With Collards | Creamy Swiss Chard Pasta Lemon Zest | Instant Kimchi With Greens. The brief cooking halts an enzymatic process that would otherwise make the leaves continue to decay even in the freezer. 2007 - 2020 Kathie N. Lapcevic. You can also clean your greens, cook them immediately and keep them in the refrigerator to bolster meals throughout the week. Transfer to a bowl, drizzle with a little olive oil, season with salt and massage until coated and tenderized. Note: chard and bok choy have thick but tender and delicious leaf stalks, but they do not freeze well. Roll up each dish towel lengthwise and squeeze to absorb excess liquid. Lightly waxed leaves. Drain and cool. They’re also delicious and nutritious. You can link to this site as much as you want, but please don't use any content or photographs without my permission. Stir a bit to keep it from clumping. I often mix whatever is ready: orach, spinach, kale, chard, dandelion, purslane, and more in my frozen smoothie green packets. You can sauté them straight from the freezer (no need to thaw) with some olive oil or butter until tender, or stir them into any number of soups, stews or curries. Preserving the live branches will allow you to enjoy them for months or years to come. Squeeze the blanched and chilled greens hard to get out as much of the water content as possible. Methods to Preserve Leaves. Pack into freezer containers. Let them sit for a couple of minutes, allowing sediment to sink to the bottom of the bowl. You would definitely have to pressure can it but I would guess it's going to get quite bitter after all that heating. Chop if desired. The easiest way to preserve a foliage branch such as evergreen is to air dry it. Working in batches if necessary, toss handfuls of your greens into the boiling water, stir to cover and blanch until bright green and softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Microwave for 30 seconds to 3 minutes. I would love to figure out a way to preserve to then enjoy in the winter months. Does anyone have experience with juicing (carrots, celery, spinach, kale) and then canning using presser cooker due to most of these veggies being low acidity? Follow NYT Food on Twitter and NYT Cooking on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest. They’ll keep refrigerated for a few days. Strip away and discard tough leaf midribs and stems. Transfer to a lidded container — or resealable freezer bag, pressing out excess air — and freeze for up to two months. Store in airtight container. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Pour mixture into 1 … While you are waiting for the water to boil, wash the leafy greens by swishing them around in a sink full of water. Leafy greens such as spinach, kale, and chard need to be briefly cooked before they are frozen. I often mix whatever is ready: orach, spinach, kale, chard, dandelion, purslane, and more in my frozen smoothie green packets. See more ideas about How to preserve leaves, Leaf crafts, Crafts. Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul/EyeEm/Getty Images, Wash the Greens and Bring a Pot of Water to a Boil, annick vanderschelden photography/Getty Images, annick vanderschelden photography / Getty Images, Squeeze the Water Out of Blanched Greens Before Freezing, The Easiest Way to Harvest and Preserve Fresh Grape Leaves, Blanching in Cooking and Food Preservation. Blanch and freeze the green parts of these vegetables and reserve the leaf stalks to use fresh in a recipe. Arrange leaves on top of two paper towels. or farmers’ market, storing your seasonal bounty can be a challenge. Sturdy greens like kale, collard greens, Swiss chard, mustard greens and others can take up a lot of valuable real estate. Leda Meredith is a food writer and certified botanist who has written five books on foraging and preserving food. Then, remove the greens to a colander, dump the water and repeat the process two or three more times. Use a double boiler to melt beeswax, but don't allow it to boil. Use Frozen Greens in These Recipes: Italian Pasta and Chickpea Stew | Moroccan Chickpeas With Chard | Creamed Greens Potpie. We love our daily juicing and have an abundance of leafy greens. If there's something you want to use somewhere else either online or in print, e-mail me and we'll work it out. Blanch in boiling water for two minutes. i found i can use them like grape leaves to roll into dolmatas. There is no way to can in oil safely that I know of... usually grape leaves are fermented or pickled before being canned or used at least in the methods I'm most familiar. But I think I need to get the dehydrator out and try making my own powdered greens for smoothies! 1. Prep your greens the same way you would if using them fresh — stripping the leaves from the stems, tearing them into bite-size pieces and washing them — but instead of drying the greens, blanch them. Evergreen branches, such as those from fir or pine trees, are common in wreaths and other holiday flower arrangements. Working in batches as needed, transfer to a salad spinner or colander to remove excess liquid, then set greens on clean, dry dish towels in a single layer. Freezing the juice would likely be better but, of course, not shelf stable. This is a very personal thing but I don’t find this to be a tasty option. Pack the blanched, chopped leafy greens into freezer bags or containers. Use a steamer basket or pasta pot to do multiple batches quickly by keeping the water hot. Method 2: Dip . Green powders are quite expensive but it’s simply a blend of dried greens that have been ground. Sturdy greens retain their texture after being blanched, frozen and reheated, so freezing is a great way to preserve them. When preserving greens, don’t be afraid to mix up the varieties. Get daily tips and expert advice to help you take your cooking skills to the next level. These greens can produce rapidly and often at a pace, along with everything else in a garden, that can be hard to keep up with before spoilage sets in. Prep them first: Discard any rubber bands or wire fasteners holding your greens together, strip the greens from the stems (save the stems for sautés or stews) and tear large leaves into bite-size pieces.