short? (Gary M. Katz demonstrated a similar technique in “Baseboard Done Better,” FHB #174) Both sides of the joint need a little attention. Raise your hand if you have ever cut what you thought was a perfect crown cope only to find out it was open on the top or bottom? (As a simple illustration of the set up.) Instead of using a coping saw, learn to cope baseboard with a miter saw. Created out of need, the techniques are based partly on math, partly on common sense, and partly on learning from mistakes. Get home building tips, offers, and expert advice in your inbox. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. I use the plywood to set the position of a stop and screw the stop to the auxiliary table. The other option is to cope your corners. Angle the coping saw about 30 degrees to remove more wood from the back of the molding than the front. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 182,674 times. This makes the pieces that you’re cutting more manageable. Thanks for any assistance. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. So getting two miters to meet tight and right is challenging or impossible. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. Copyright © 1999-2020 DDFM Enterprises. What would y’all do in this situation? I mean, from just looking at the miter, not the joint. Cutting on the flat with a sharp blade may seem efficient and precise, but if the crown has even a small cup on the back, it will throw off your compound miter in wacky ways. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. 4 Smooth out the rough edges of the coped cut with sandpaper or a round file. Keep up the good work. Don’t just use the crown holder for the cope joints, it’s great for outside miters as well! To learn more, including how to fix gaps or excess material in between your pieces of crown molding, scroll down. It was suggested that we read this article and I have found it truly informative and influential! Read our comment policy for more information. We recommend our users to update the browser. Bill. Once you have determined the projection, you need to reproduce the measurement accurately and consistently in your miter cuts and in the installation of the coped joint. Coping crown molding is as much an art as it is a science. When facing the corner, is your left hand the side with the left corner, or is the left end of the board the left corner (which is the exact opposite)? The tool would collide into the material and not cut all the way through. If you do cut miters for inside corners, each piece must be cut precisely the right angle and length. Use files, rasps or sandpaper to clean up their cope cuts. Don’t run the file back and forth so quickly that you snap the crown molding. You can do this with a miter, coping, or circular saw. Use silicone caulk to fill in any gaps after you’ve installed your crown molding. If you aren’t familiar with a coping saw, this may take you a little longer. Crowns are often larger than other mouldings and are usually installed at a 45 degree angle. Coped trim also stays tight-even when the wood shrinks, the walls shift or the vacuum cleaner whacks it. A carpenter would nail everything by hand. But there are two problems with that approach. We has a 58 degree spring crown with a 4 1\4 inch rise 7inch run, that you couldn’t cut beded against the fence. I test-fit the mate of the piece and scribe the point onto the opposite piece, then make a shallow cut with a fine-toothed handsaw (photo right). References. 3 Cut along darkened edge with a coping saw, angling the blade back as you follow the curved profile of the molding. The 5″ crown sitting at a 68 degree spring angle should fit in a 5 3/8 space since most of the crown would be on the ceiling. Great article as always. Few things are more enjoyable than clean coped joints and Beta motorcycles! Follow the profile created by the miter cut. The most-important concept to keep in mind is that every crown profile is designed for a fixed wall and ceiling projection. 1. For large crown with a cup I will double stick tape shims to the saw table to keep the crown from rocking. Super stoked to get the CM2 this week and get my money printing press in action!! wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. There are 16 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. Every day at wikiHow, we work hard to give you access to instructions and information that will help you live a better life, whether it's keeping you safer, healthier, or improving your well-being.