If you get an unsolicited or suspicious phone call from someone claiming to be from Apple, just hang up. The message looks significantly different from other messages that you’ve received from the company. If installed, unknown or unwanted software may become intrusive and annoying and could even damage your Mac and steal your data. Cupertino, Calif. - A new phishing scam is hitting apple users' email inboxes, attempting to steal valuable information. If you're on a Mac, select the email and choose Forward As Attachment from the Message menu. Scammers often try to trick you into sharing personal or financial information by sending you messages or links to websites that might look like they’re from Apple, but their actual purpose is to steal your account information. The sender’s email or phone doesn’t match the name of the company that it claims to be from. Ignore the message and simply navigate away from the page or close the entire window or tab. Mostly cloudy skies. Emails from Apple Support will never ask you to verify your Social Security Number, your mother's maiden name, full credit card numbers or credit card CCV codes, Only update your account or payment information on the Apple website or through your iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch settings, If you come across a phishing email, Apple asks that your forward it on to. If you think your account information was compromised, immediately change your Apple ID on the Apple website. Genuine purchase receipts—from purchases in the App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, or Apple Music—include your current billing address, which scammers are unlikely to have. The message requests personal information, like a credit card number or account password. This includes apps that ask to install configuration profiles that can then control your device. Sorry, there are no recent results for popular commented articles. In an email copy given to KHQ, there are several commas missing and random choices of words. *To confirm the destination of a link on your Mac, hover your pointer over the link to see the URL. The message is unsolicited and contains an attachment. Apple Support posted an article that outlined some other ways to identify legitimate emails from Apple. The message requests personal information, like a credit card number or account password. A link appears to be legitimate but takes you to a website whose URL doesn’t match the address of the company’s website.*. Apple Support posted an article that outlined some other ways to identify legitimate emails from Apple. The email or phone they used to contact you is different from the one that you gave that company. If you can't see the URL in the status bar in Safari, choose View > Show Status Bar. Tap the calendar, then scroll down and tap Delete Calendar. On your iOS device, touch and hold the link. You can report fraudulent tech support calls to the Federal Trade Commission (U.S. only) at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or to your local law enforcement agency. If you receive an email about an App Store or iTunes Store purchase, and you’re not sure whether it is real, you can look for a couple of things that can help confirm that the message is from Apple. Scammers try to copy email and text messages from legitimate companies to trick you into giving them your personal information and passwords. If you unintentionally subscribed to a calendar you didn't want, open the Calendar app, tap Calendars and look for an unknown or suspicious calendar. You can also review your App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, or Apple Music purchase history. Identify legitimate emails from the App Store or iTunes Store, update your account or payment information. In general, never share personal information like credit card numbers, unless you can verify the recipient is who they claim to be. These types of pop-ups are usually fraudulent advertisements, designed to trick you into giving the scammer personal information or money. What should you do if you come across one of these emails? Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. If you receive an email asking you to update your account or payment information, only do so in Settings directly on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch; in iTunes or the App Store on your Mac; or in iTunes on a PC. That email is not from Apple, but instead, a scammer who wants to steal any piece of information you can give them. The message looks significantly different from other messages that you’ve received from the company. Low 31F. If you have an email from Apple that claims your Apple ID is locked until you 'verify your identify,' delete it now. Emails about your App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, or Apple Music purchases will never ask you to provide this information over email: Learn more about phishing and other scams. Winds light and variable. If you think you might have entered personal information like a password or credit card info on a scam website, immediately change your Apple ID password. If you get an unwanted or suspicious calendar invitation in Mail or Calendar, you can report it as Junk in iCloud. If you’re not sure whether an email about an App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, or Apple Music purchase is legitimate, these tips may help. Apple would like you to tell them about Apple related phishing emails. Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device. If you have any doubts about a request or communication, or even if you if you just need to update your information with a company, contact that company directly. While browsing the web, if you see a message that your iPhone, Mac, or other Apple device has a virus, or someone claiming to be from Apple calls and asks for your account name and password, you’re likely the target of a scam. If you think you've received a scam email, you should forward the email to [email protected], Apple's support address. A link in a message looks right, but the URL doesn’t match the company’s website.*. If you received a suspicious email, please forward it to [email protected] If you receive a phishing email that's designed to look like it’s from Apple, send it to, To report spam or other suspicious emails that you receive in your iCloud.com, me.com, or mac.com Inbox, send them to, To report spam or other suspicious messages that you receive through iMessage, tap Report Junk under the message. To avoid unwanted, fake, or malicious software, install software from the App Store or get it directly from the developer's website. Others might look like a receipt for a purchase in the App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store or for Apple Music, that you’re certain you didn’t make.